Tuesday, 18 September 2018

Great Yarmouth Horse Racing Open For Business

Great Yarmouth Racecourse
This well-known racecourse is one mile north of Great Yarmouth, belonging to Arena Racing Company. The well-designed track assumes the shape of a narrow four-sided figure that’s about one mile and three-quarters round, with two fairly long straights that measure about five furlongs. It is among Britain’s many left-handed courses, used for flat turf racing events. 

The racecourse hosts some of the most noteworthy sporting events on the British calendar and it is, as a result of its busy schedule, a leading horse racing ground in Britain if not Europe. 

Racing meetings were recorded for the first time in 1715 when a lease was issued by the Yarmouth Corporation to an association of visionary innkeepers for some piece of land where the group could stage local race meetings. Events may well have taken place at Great Yarmouth before the recorded date. Nonetheless, it is generally believed that such activities, if any at all, must have been infrequent involving small groups of individuals from Norfolk.

Sports historians believe horse racing at Great Yarmouth must have been quite intermittent throughout the 18th century. Racing almost certainly coincided with the annual town fair. 

Miscellaneous events such as donkey racing competitions and chasing a swine with a soap-stained tail were staged. In 1810 formal racing began. Records show meetings involving thoroughbred races and ample prize money at Great Yarmouth Racecourse from this date. 

Great Yarmouth Racecourse, on the South Denes, became fully established shortly after. A two-day race meeting was convened in the late summer every year. From 1866 race fixtures increased. The continuous upward trend carried on from decade to decade until the long-established racing facility soared to its current glory as one of the world’s most influential horse riding amenities.


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Racing at Great Yarmouth restarted after a short suspension during the first world war. In 1920, the just reopened racecourse was relocated to the nearby North Denes, as a result of immense pressure from the local fishing industry to extend its structures onto the piece of land on the South Denes. Two grandstands were demolished and shifted to North Denes, where they are presently situated. As such, Great Yarmouth is one of the oldest racing structures in the United Kingdom that have maintained their initial geographical positions to the present day. Great Yarmouth’s enduring fame and stature are a testament to Britain’s long and colorful racing history that stretches over four centuries of enthusiastic horse sporting. 


The local authorities had taken over the running of the racecourse in 1904, and for most of the 20th century, the course profited from the local community, not only by offering entertainment but also because its proceeds helped to maintain their rates at the bare-minimum. Since 2001, they have been the smaller shareholders in a new company formed to manage the distinguished racecourse. A private entity, Arena Racing Company, is the main shareholder. For that time, they have been capable of financing improvements that the Council could not fund, including the building of an extra grandstand. 


The most important event at Great Yarmouth is the John Musker Fillies' Stakes, staged over one mile and a quarter every year in September. Nevertheless, any of the racing events for two-year-olds can be chiefly instructive as some of these juveniles go on to participate in and win highly regarded races. 

During the 1998 competitions, Dubai Millennium won his debut at Yarmouth extraordinarily, ably ridden by Frankie Dettori, prior to becoming one of the most accomplished horses to run for the Godolphin operation, proudly owned by the Dubai royal family. Since then, Great Yarmouth victors included Ouija Board, who further won the English and Irish Oaks before registering impressive, score at the Breeders Cup, the yearly international horse racing championships held in the USA. Wilko, Raven's Pass and Donativum were among the winners at Yarmouth headed for future Breeders Cup glory. 

Visit Great Yarmouth Racecourse Website Here

Contact details: Great Yarmouth, Jellicoe Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, NR30 4AU

Tel: 01493 842527

Email: info@greatyarmouth-racecourse.co.uk 

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Monday, 17 September 2018

History of Hexham Racecourse

Hexham racecourse
Hexham Racecourse is a thoroughbred racing venue that is located in Hexham in Northumberland – England. Suitably positioned 800 feet above sea level at High Yarridge, the left-handed circuit measures one-and-a-half miles, with a hilly rise toward the finishing line. The racecourse’s run-in stretches over 250 yards and it is perfectly laid out with a zero gradient. 

Additionally, the Hexham National Hunt course features ten fences meant for steeplechase events. Hexham holds the record of the being the northernmost National Hunt sporting arena in the whole of England. Since it is situated in a majorly remote locale, there are no events held at the racecourse in the month of February.

The rich history of Hexham Racecourse spans over one hundred years. Opening its doors in 1890 as low-profile racing spot, the sporting arena has established itself as one of the most remarkable facilities in northern Britain and the United Kingdom as a whole. The management and fans celebrated 125 years of racing success in 2015. 

The spectacular 2015 celebrations attracted countless hordes of electrified racing fanatics and prominent track personages from the entire country. At the same time, the anniversary elicited extensive media coverage on television and in various print bulletins. It was an unprecedentedly thrilling day as the administration articulated one laudable milestone after another. It gave Hexham a new birth of fame and popularity that reverberated across the global horse sporting fraternity. 

At the time of its opening in 1890, Rothbury and Newcastle were the only steeplechasing courses at Hexham. However, the venue has now made distinct advancements and presently boasts a bigger and more refurbished steeplechasing facility. Little is known about the racing occasions that took place before 1890. It is nevertheless believed that several dozens of horse riding events were held at Hexham Racecourse.

Nonetheless, official documents show that the first recorded racing event happened on 23 April 1890. The preliminary 6 card occasion attracted a total of 31 participants. Some of the 19th racing event’s organisers included Sir Loftus Bates and Charles Henderson. Again, the awards give to early winners are not captured in the available historical documents. 
While irrefutable evidence shows that the location was used for low-profile horse riding tournaments that were locally organised, the sporting occasions held at Hexham before 1890 were arranged and run before it became a registered racecourse. It became a racecourse only after an influential group of well-off gentlemen pooled resources to purchase land for the sporting grounds from Charles Henderson.

After accepting to sell the land for the noble community initiative, Charles Henderson volunteered his horse riding acumen to the management of the fledgeling racing amenity. Coupled with the insightful ideas from the other devoted members of the close-knit group, the devoted bunch of racing enthusiasts gradually steered the new racing grounds through debilitating obstacles to its present glory.  

Besides having well-structured courses and tracks, Hexham has top class hospitality facilities to cater for their visitor’s needs. Whether it's soft or alcoholic beverages, the management has pubs and restaurants that offer scrumptious indigenous and exotic cuisines. With a wide range of affordable dining and accommodation facilities, guests at Hexham have a wide hospitality services packages.*

Visit Hexham racecourse here

Contact detail: Hexham Racecourse, High Yarridge, Hexham, Northumberland, NE46 2JP

Tel: 01434 606881 

Email: robert@hexham-racecourse.co.uk 

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Sunday, 16 September 2018

Bath Racecourse Website, Twitter Link & Facebook Page

racecourse directory, horse racing, horse trainer directory,
Owned by the Arena Racing Company, Bath Racecourse is a venue for thoroughbred horses racing that is located North of Bath, Somerset. Its ovular left-handed track has a half a mile run-in and measures 1 mile 4 furlongs and 25 yards. The first racing at Bath took place in 1728. In 1811, a local family, the Blathwayts, held a memorable race at the grounds – signaling the start of steady racing events at the Bath Racecourse that continue to this day.

Traditionally, the racecourse only held one meeting in a year. The number of annual meetings has progressively increased to 22 meetings in 2016. While the racecourse has hosted various notable events over the last three centuries, the Somersetshire Stakes remains the most widely acclaimed occasion whose enduring legacy survives till now.
Initially, Bath Racecourse had many grandstand structures. However, some of these have undergone a series of transformative modifications in an effort to give the venue a world-class outlook that befits its racing heritage. The result of this redevelopment is a more spacious and splendidly magnificent facility that attracts huge numbers of racegoers, patrons, and sports sightseers from all over the globe.

Bath Racecourse has been undergoing major architectural alterations to meet the ever-changing needs of racegoers and racing enthusiasts alike. For instance, the facility started a multi-million pound redesigning in 2015. The mega structural overhaul is proudly financed by the Arena Racing Company – the biggest group of racecourses in the whole of the United Kingdom. 

In terms of amenities, Bath Racecourse is among the leading racecourses that provide top-notch social and hospitality services in the United Kingdom. To begin with, the racing venue is surrounded by five widely recognized hotels. These popular Bath hotels include The Studio, Church House, Home Farm Boreham, Calcot Manor, and Godney Post House. These dining and accommodation facilities serve alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks, native and exotic foods, expertly prepared cocktails, as well as affordable lodges. All the five hotels have previously received progressively more rave reviews from both popular British patrons and visiting foreigners.

Located in Bath City, the Bath Racecourse area features attractions such as excellent relaxation hot springs. Visitors to the universally recognized racing venue have the chance to book the best Bath hotels and get the opportunity to explore the fabulous sounds and sights of southwest England. For lovers of clubbing and nightlife, the ornate Georgian city, which is beautifully hidden in terraces and winding lanes and streets, provides more than anyone can fully sample. Exploring the city of Bath, anyone will no doubt discover a lot of thrilling nightlife that suits their wildest tastes. Among the most spectacular highlights around the racecourse include buzzing pubs, arthouse theatres, and cinemas, as well as other great facilities to while away even the most boring night in a most colorful style. 

Finally, visitors to Bath Racecourse have the chance to savor the best of arts and cultures in Bath. The city has always showcased its ardent love for the arts in rich galleries that include both native and international collections. The expansive city looks like a large open-air museum to a first-time sojourner. Much of the metropolis is a World Heritage Site owing to its indelible associations with the olden Roman Empire. The Georgian architectural themes that dot the city are a scenic site to behold to Bath Racecourse visitors.

Bath racecourse social media.*

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Saturday, 15 September 2018

Chester Racecourse - Fundamental Info

Chester racecourse
Also known as the Roodee, Chester Racecourse is the oldest racecourse whose track activities have continued to attract widespread influence in Britain and the larger world. According to existing historical records, racing events at Chester started in the early decades of the 16th century. Although some of the official records do not exist, it can be accurately said that events were taking place at the racecourse as early as 1511.

Again, the sporting site is regarded as the smallest racecourse of global significance in the whole of England. It measures about one mile and one furlong – equal to an estimated 1.8 kilometers. Nonetheless, its colossal influence on the history and variety of Europe’s horse sports can only be rivalled by very few racecourses in Britain.

Another notable fact about Chester Racecourse is that it lies on the banks of River Dee. The area of land on which the racecourse stands was once used as a harbour during the Dark Ages. However, sitting around the river bank area led to the closure of the racing facility and, a few decades later, the grounds were used for horse riding training and competitions. Ever since the fame and glory has not waned over the last four centuries.

In the middle of the racecourse, there is a raised mound which is ornately decorated. The mound is popularly referred to as rood’ and has become one of the most prominent physical landmarks that distinguish the sporting spot from similar amenities in Britain. From the word rood’, the alternative name for the racecourse was coined. A corruption of the phrase rood eye’, Roodee loosely translates to "The Island of the Cross". Historically, Chester is one of the leading ancient establishments that have inspired the way horse racing track events are conducted today.

Popular legend has it that the much-talked-about cross marks identify the burial site of the mythological statue of Virgin Mary who was sentenced to hang for conspiring in the murder of Lady Trawst, the legendary Governor of Hawarden. It is mythically believed that she had gone to intercede with the heavens on behalf of the drought-stricken area. However, her supplications elicited a lot of thunderstorms and her statue loosened and fell on the governor’s wife. It is believed that the statue was found guilty by a 12-man jury. Although this sounds like a hopelessly inaccurate mythology to a foreigner it is one of the reasons why locals hold the global facility in immense esteem.

As a result, the guilty’ statue was infamously burned for having caused a most painful murder that sends the whole olden community mourning the onset of the beloved governor’s tragic widower-hood. If this legendary story has any factual merits, then this enters history as the first use of a formal jury in the legal circles. Whether purely mythological or true, these cross marks join a host of other intriguing peculiarities that have made this racecourse outstandingly influential in the world of horse racing and beyond. 

Despite how outsiders may view this mythical record, locals hold it as a time-old truth that cannot be successfully discredited.

Few facilities can outstrip the fame of Chester Racecourse. The site was the home to the bloody but famous Goteddsday football competitions. The historical football melee engendered so much infamy that the authorities of the day replaced the soccer events with horse racing championships in 1539. This change of the track’s functions was ratified with the consent of Mayor Henry Gee. It is the influential name of this respected local ruler that birthed the widespread use of the gee-gee’ term in horse handling. Summarily, the medieval racing grounds have hosted one of the oldest riding occasions ever recorded in the annals of horse sporting.  

The position of the racecourse is one of the strongest explanations for its being a leading racing site in Britain. In particular, its proximity to the city makes event meetings very popular and boosts training and track championships turn-outs. Specifically, the hospitality services offered at the racecourse and in the neighbouring centres make it a top favourite to sightseers as well as millions of racing fanatics in the whole world. 

The Chester May Festival is especially well-attended to celebrate the arrival of the summer season. Chester’s tracks and courses are aptly set in a luxurious background with exclusive facilities that enable patrons to have a first-hand view of horse riding events as they unfold on the track. 

Contact details: The racecourse, Chester, CH1 2LY

Tel: 01244 304 600 

Email: enquiries@chester-races.com 

Visit Chester racecourse website here. 

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