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Monday, 9 May 2022

Catterick Racecourse Website, Twitter & Facebook

Catterick Bridge Racecourse is a thoroughbred horse racing site that is found in the hamlet of the Catterick Bridge – North Yorkshire, England. The horse riding grounds recorded the first-ever racing occasion in 1783, although the exact date and month is still a debated subject among horse racing historians today. 

The sharp and undulating facility has a left-handed track with a circumference of about one mile and a 3-furlong run-in. The grounds are a top favourite to thousands of trainers and racers since its gravel subsoil makes it fairly easy to navigate.  

The Catterick Sunday Market, one of the reasons as to why the sporting amenity is well regarded, is the largest market in the whole of North England. The internationally well-liked racing champion, Collier Hill, registered his first flat race at this facility in 2002. The most attended event on this globally influential track is the North Yorkshire Grand National, which is annually held in January. The racecourse is further set to benefit from a series of structural overhauls that have been recently launched to make the already stunning racecourse all-weather and able to accommodate more events, racers, and patrons.

Catterick Racecourse has wonderful hospitality packages that cater to the needs of both racers and guests. Whether you are alone or in the company of your loved ones and friends, this racecourse will no doubt leave all of you optimally satisfied. The horse riding site and its environs host a vast number of world-class hotels that offer at least something extraordinary for virtually everyone out there. 
The Castle House is an example of the very best hotels at this North Yorkshire racing facility. Located in one of the most eye-catching Richmond surrounds, the top-class dining and accommodation facility provides tasty foods and beverages that will win the approval and appetite of even the finickiest of gourmets. Most predictably, their friendly staff will approach you in a most honourable and obliging manner, and then proceed to ask you how they may help. It is an irresistibly fine home away from your own. 

Even if you do not like the other dining and accommodation facilities offered by any other hotels around this racecourse, Greyhound Inn will no doubt make all the difference. The 3-star hotel provides a wide selection of package at competitively affordable prices. Built with keen respect to the traditional architectural themes of the 1700s, this classy restaurant derives its name from the famous Duke of Leeds who fancied Greyhound Racing. Other restaurants at the racing spot include Black Horse Inn and Low Gingerfield Farm B&B. The wide range of hotel choices increases the grand appeal of Catterick Racecourse. It is among the top reasons why patrons and tourists to this racing establishment keep visiting again and again.  

After entering the racecourse, you will receive six entry vouchers for every horse you bring in. However, note that the vouchers will only be valid once your horses have been cleared to run. Apart from these basic admission terms, any additional badges may be applied for by telephoning the support personnel. 

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Sunday, 8 May 2022

Your Guide to York Racecourse

York Racecourse is one of the leading Premier tracks in the whole of Europe having lately registered a widely acclaimed win during the Flat Racecourse of the Year Award and again emerged top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain's racecourses.

York Racecourse traces an illustrious history back to Roman and Viking eras. Currently, it is a lively city flourishing as a commercial, sightseeing and regionally leading centre. With a wide range of famous restaurants, excellent shopping opportunities and top-rated attractions, including the universally Jorvik Viking Centre and National Railway Museum, as well as the interesting history of the Minster, Castle and City Walls, supplements York’s all-embracing assortment of first-rate hotel accommodation facilities.

According to the earliest available documents, horseracing functions started at York during the heydays of the enigmatic Emperor Severus in Roman times. Nonetheless, most of the 360,000 fans who will attend the reigning "Northern Racecourse of the Year" this upcoming racing season are not likely to know they are actually taking part in an auspicious spectacle that took place for the very first time about a whole 2,000 years ago.

York Corporation archived documents show that the City initially supported racing events in 1530. In mid-1607, horse sporting is known to have occurred on the ice-covered river Ouse, between Micklegate Tower and the landmark Skeldergate Postern.

The very first all-inclusive records of a race occasion date from 1709, at a time when much of the work was undertaken to improve the racecourse at Clifton Ings which was usually susceptible to regular floods. Regardless of this work, the floods persisted and in 1730 racing shifted to Knavesmire, where the racecourse remains.

As its name clearly implies, Knavesmire was a mire with a prominent stream running through it and a significant amount of leveling and draining was needed to come up the horseshoe shaped racecourse, which was launched for its maiden meeting in 1731.

No permanent structures were put up on Knavesmire up to the time the well-known York architect, John Carr, designed and meticulously constructed the first Grandstand in 1754. This was funded by 250 individuals who each forked out 5 guineas. Each patron and their respective successors were entitled to make use of the stand during the site's lease and were provided with a brass token that contained their name and a prominent photograph of the stand. This represented the model for the late impressive County Stand Badge. 

The York Racecourse Committee, (presently part of York Racecourse Knavesmire LLP) still runs racing at York today and was set up in 1842, to turn around a major decline in the excellence of racing events. By late 1846, the Committee had established the Gimcrack Stakes, which has since this time become among York's most steady races.
York Races' development has been captured in the advancement of the grandstands over the past few years. New stands were put up in 1890 to include much of the initial building and a foremost improvement program, unveiled in 1962, led to the launch of the distinct five-tier grandstand in 1965. The program of improvisations rolled on and by1989 the Melrose Stand was already unveiled, swiftly followed by the prized Knavesmire Stand, with supplementary conference facilities in 1996. In 2003, the Ebor Stand containing, amongst other features, the Nunthorpe Suite, was opened and was preserved for race days for exclusive use by the honorable Annual Badge holders.

In the past few years, York Racecourse, besides hosting numerous stunning York Races, has also staged the Royal Ascot at York in 2005 plus The Ladbrokes St Leger in 2006. 
Despite its prominence with regard to hosting major horse sporting events, York Racecourse is also home to many outstandingly popular hospitality facilities. With well-stocked bars and well-furnished eateries, the facility offers tasty cuisines that will fulfill the wildest appetites of even the finickiest of gourmets. With affordable dining and accommodation amenities, the ubiquitously well-liked racing site has received countless thousands of rave reviews from hordes of enthusiastic sporting adherents as well as the treasured accreditation of high flying racing gurus from all over Europe and the world at large. The hustle and bustle that is the very highlight of a typical racing occasion at York elicit a great deal of comprehensive media coverage since most of the distinguished racecourse’s sporting events are televised live to all across the globe.

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Contact details: York Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Tel: 01904 620911 

Email: enquiries@yorkracecourse.co.uk 


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Wednesday, 4 May 2022

Chester Racecourse - Fundamental Info

Also known as the Roodee, Chester Racecourse is the oldest racecourse whose track activities have continued to attract widespread influence in Britain and the larger world. According to existing historical records, racing events at Chester started in the early decades of the 16th century. Although some of the official records do not exist, it can be accurately said that events were taking place at the racecourse as early as 1511.

Again, the sporting site is regarded as the smallest racecourse of global significance in the whole of England. It measures about one mile and one furlong – equal to an estimated 1.8 kilometers. Nonetheless, its colossal influence on the history and variety of Europe’s horse sports can only be rivalled by very few racecourses in Britain.

Another notable fact about Chester Racecourse is that it lies on the banks of River Dee. The area of land on which the racecourse stands was once used as a harbour during the Dark Ages. However, sitting around the river bank area led to the closure of the racing facility and, a few decades later, the grounds were used for horse riding training and competitions. Ever since the fame and glory has not waned over the last four centuries.

In the middle of the racecourse, there is a raised mound which is ornately decorated. The mound is popularly referred to as rood’ and has become one of the most prominent physical landmarks that distinguish the sporting spot from similar amenities in Britain. From the word rood’, the alternative name for the racecourse was coined. A corruption of the phrase rood eye’, Roodee loosely translates to "The Island of the Cross". Historically, Chester is one of the leading ancient establishments that have inspired the way horse racing track events are conducted today.

Popular legend has it that the much-talked-about cross marks identify the burial site of the mythological statue of Virgin Mary who was sentenced to hang for conspiring in the murder of Lady Trawst, the legendary Governor of Hawarden. It is mythically believed that she had gone to intercede with the heavens on behalf of the drought-stricken area. However, her supplications elicited a lot of thunderstorms and her statue loosened and fell on the governor’s wife. It is believed that the statue was found guilty by a 12-man jury. Although this sounds like a hopelessly inaccurate mythology to a foreigner it is one of the reasons why locals hold the global facility in immense esteem.

As a result, the guilty’ statue was infamously burned for having caused a most painful murder that sends the whole olden community mourning the onset of the beloved governor’s tragic widower-hood. If this legendary story has any factual merits, then this enters history as the first use of a formal jury in the legal circles. Whether purely mythological or true, these cross marks join a host of other intriguing peculiarities that have made this racecourse outstandingly influential in the world of horse racing and beyond. 

Despite how outsiders may view this mythical record, locals hold it as a time-old truth that cannot be successfully discredited.

Few facilities can outstrip the fame of Chester Racecourse. The site was the home to the bloody but famous Goteddsday football competitions. The historical football melee engendered so much infamy that the authorities of the day replaced the soccer events with horse racing championships in 1539. This change of the track’s functions was ratified with the consent of Mayor Henry Gee. It is the influential name of this respected local ruler that birthed the widespread use of the gee-gee’ term in horse handling. Summarily, the medieval racing grounds have hosted one of the oldest riding occasions ever recorded in the annals of horse sporting.  

The position of the racecourse is one of the strongest explanations for its being a leading racing site in Britain. In particular, its proximity to the city makes event meetings very popular and boosts training and track championships turn-outs. Specifically, the hospitality services offered at the racecourse and in the neighbouring centres make it a top favourite to sightseers as well as millions of racing fanatics in the whole world. 

The Chester May Festival is especially well-attended to celebrate the arrival of the summer season. Chester’s tracks and courses are aptly set in a luxurious background with exclusive facilities that enable patrons to have a first-hand view of horse riding events as they unfold on the track. 

Contact details: The racecourse, Chester, CH1 2LY

Tel: 01244 304 600 

Email: enquiries@chester-races.com 

Visit Chester racecourse website here. 

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Monday, 2 May 2022

Bath Racecourse Website, Twitter Link & Facebook Page

Owned by the Arena Racing Company, Bath Racecourse is a venue for thoroughbred horses racing that is located North of Bath, Somerset. Its ovular left-handed track has a half a mile run-in and measures 1 mile 4 furlongs and 25 yards. The first racing at Bath took place in 1728. In 1811, a local family, the Blathwayts, held a memorable race at the grounds – signaling the start of steady racing events at the Bath Racecourse that continue to this day.

Traditionally, the racecourse only held one meeting in a year. The number of annual meetings has progressively increased to 22 meetings in 2016. While the racecourse has hosted various notable events over the last three centuries, the Somersetshire Stakes remains the most widely acclaimed occasion whose enduring legacy survives till now.
Initially, Bath Racecourse had many grandstand structures. However, some of these have undergone a series of transformative modifications in an effort to give the venue a world-class outlook that befits its racing heritage. The result of this redevelopment is a more spacious and splendidly magnificent facility that attracts huge numbers of racegoers, patrons, and sports sightseers from all over the globe.

Bath Racecourse has been undergoing major architectural alterations to meet the ever-changing needs of racegoers and racing enthusiasts alike. For instance, the facility started a multi-million pound redesigning in 2015. The mega structural overhaul is proudly financed by the Arena Racing Company – the biggest group of racecourses in the whole of the United Kingdom. 

In terms of amenities, Bath Racecourse is among the leading racecourses that provide top-notch social and hospitality services in the United Kingdom. To begin with, the racing venue is surrounded by five widely recognized hotels. These popular Bath hotels include The Studio, Church House, Home Farm Boreham, Calcot Manor, and Godney Post House. These dining and accommodation facilities serve alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks, native and exotic foods, expertly prepared cocktails, as well as affordable lodges. All the five hotels have previously received progressively more rave reviews from both popular British patrons and visiting foreigners.

Located in Bath City, the Bath Racecourse area features attractions such as excellent relaxation hot springs. Visitors to the universally recognized racing venue have the chance to book the best Bath hotels and get the opportunity to explore the fabulous sounds and sights of southwest England. For lovers of clubbing and nightlife, the ornate Georgian city, which is beautifully hidden in terraces and winding lanes and streets, provides more than anyone can fully sample. Exploring the city of Bath, anyone will no doubt discover a lot of thrilling nightlife that suits their wildest tastes. Among the most spectacular highlights around the racecourse include buzzing pubs, arthouse theatres, and cinemas, as well as other great facilities to while away even the most boring night in a most colorful style. 

Finally, visitors to Bath Racecourse have the chance to savor the best of arts and cultures in Bath. The city has always showcased its ardent love for the arts in rich galleries that include both native and international collections. The expansive city looks like a large open-air museum to a first-time sojourner. Much of the metropolis is a World Heritage Site owing to its indelible associations with the olden Roman Empire. The Georgian architectural themes that dot the city are a scenic site to behold to Bath Racecourse visitors.

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