Monday, 16 September 2019

Latest News from Brighton Racecourse

Brighton racecourse
Located one mile to the northeastern part of Brighton in West Sussex, Brighton Racecourse belongs to the Arena Racing Company. The colorful history of this fine English racecourse stretches back to over three centuries. While credible documentary evidence attests to the fact that sporting events were already happening at Brighton Racecourse as early as 1713, the very first public competitions didn’t take place until 1783. Again, chronological facts provide strong clues that the initial horse riding occasions involved members of the armed forces garrisoned here in the formative years of the racecourse. Nonetheless, civilian members of the neighboring community are also likely to have participated in these preliminary fixtures.

Legend has it that George IV, during his reign as Prince of Wales, initiated hurdle races at the then fledgling Brighton Racecourse. The royal figure was taking a casual ride around the area in the company of his aristocratic mates when he discovered the amazing facility. The initial grandstand was erected at Brighton Racecourse in 1788 and was widely considered somewhat stylish according to the architectural models of the day. However, this structure was set ablaze shortly after and burned to ashes in puzzling circumstances that at once baffled the top patrons of this amenity. Nevertheless, further investigations revealed that the inferno was deliberately started by the poor squatters who had been allowed to live on the facility’s land. 

Around 1805, gaming activities at Brighton were disrupted as unresolved issues emerged between the management and the proprietor who had leased the land on which the racecourse stood. In fact, the clearly infuriated landlord threatened to plough the horse riding ground if he was not given his usual gratifying gift of wine. Apparently, he had previously enjoyed the customary drink every other season before and was now evidently disappointed that the singular gesture of well-deserved appreciation was unjustifiably revoked.

However, he was chased off by a wrathful press gang as he attempted his absurd threats. After the difficult landowner was fully restrained, racing functions resumed in earnest. It is not clear to the present generation of Brighton Racecourse sporting enthusiasts how the farmer’s rather cheap terms were met or otherwise peaceably renegotiated. Nonetheless, it is legendarily held that he must have had the retracted favor reinstated as no further similar disruptions were ever again experienced at the Sussex sporting site.

During the first few years after the racecourse won the admiration of the Welsh prince, it was principally used a favorite spot for the most fashionable races. However, it later drifted to the earlier status after the royal patron and his top classmates stopped frequenting the facility. Fortunately, railway transportation reached Brighton in 1850 and gave larger numbers of fans access to the middling racecourse. Statistics show that the introduction of railway infrastructure made it possible for fans and guests to tour the racecourse from far away cities such as London and others. As a result of this possible revenue boost, the quality of key infrastructures profoundly improved within less than a year after the very first train docked in Brighton. 

In fact, the racing field registered up to 20,000 fans after the second global war. With modish grandstands on either side of the home straight, Brighton was popularly considered to be one of the finest English sporting sites of the late 1800s. This relative fame continued into the first and middle decades of the 20th century. For instance, the racecourse established striking fame when it launched the Derby Trial in the 1960s. Holding a couple of other ubiquitously liked fixtures every year and continually enhancing its structural amenities, Brighton Racecourse has surpassed the bar mark to emerge as a leading world-class sporting behemoth that we see and hear of presently.

Currently, Brighton Racecourse still ranks among the very best equine racing establishments not only in the United Kingdom but also throughout the world. Despite being in the league of smaller’ horse riding facilities in the country, it indeed makes it into the coveted category of the greatest sporting arenas in terms of events quality. One of the good reasons for the arena’s steady fame and structural advancement is the existence of a capable executive body. In fact, Brighton is said to enjoy the rare managerial acumen of some of the most respected global names in the world of equestrian gaming.*

Visit Brighton racecourse website here. 

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Thursday, 12 September 2019

Notable Facts about Doncaster Racecourse

Doncaster racecourse, racecourse directory. racecourse news
Also known as the Town Moor course, Doncaster Racecourse is situated in Doncaster, South Yorkshire – England. The racecourse is particularly famous for hosting some singularly popular races in Great Britain – the St. Leger Stakes and the Racing Post Trophy. 

Doncaster Racecourse is indisputably one of the oldest facilities of its kind in the whole of Europe and Britain in particular. Racing dates back to the first decades of the 16th century. According to the available records, annual meetings have been held at the racecourse for well over four centuries, exempting a hiatus that occurred at the time of the world wars. 

Even though racing was temporarily stopped for some time in the early 1600s, events resumed shortly after the problematic group of ruffians who led to the infamous brief halt was effectively contained. As early as 1614, normal racing resumed at the racecourse. 

Doncaster Racecourse holds the proud status of the top 10 oldest racing facilities in England and Europe in general. In terms of physical capacity, the grounds have been mapped out as the largest horse riding amenity in the whole of Britain, with regard to surface area and the size of courses and tracks.

Owing to its prominently legendary position, Doncaster Racecourse has successfully popularized its own horse sporting competition over past decades – the Doncaster Cup. Noted as one of the most well-liked events spearheaded by an independent racing spot, the regular championships have played a critical role in enhancing the already distinctly influential status of Doncaster. As a result, the state-of-the-art amenity draws thousands of racing enthusiasts and sports sightseers from around the world.  

After the restoration of the first few decades of the 17th century, the continentally famed racing sport shifted location in 1776. Despite this relocation, the grounds have nonetheless steadily increased in fame and infrastructural capabilities. Immediately after changing its setting, Colonel St. Leger started a routine event which involved five races. 

As stated before in this article, activities at the racing field didn’t occur during the two world wars as it was used for military purposes by the indigenous forces. Due to the war-period closure, substitute regular events were instead held at Newmarket. Although the competitions did not register any laudable turn-out, they were nevertheless described as having attracted unanticipated crowds of fans that the administration had not looked forward to attracting at a time when the entire Europe was more interested in military showdowns than in the leisure excitements of sporting events. The substitute races continued for over three years, from 1915 to 1918 – successfully run until the end of the WWI.  

Located in the epicenter of the United Kingdom, the racecourse boasts extraordinary hospitality. Ranging from the unrivaled scenery of nighttime street life to a commodious Grandstand that houses wonderful treats, the site is home to hundreds of top quality dining and accommodation facilities. Despite your finicky choices, the racecourse offers at least something extraordinary for virtually everyone – including food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, recreation services, and all.

Contact details: Doncaster Racecourse, The Grandstand, Leger Way, Doncaster, DN2 6BB 

Tel: 01302 304 200

Visit Doncaster website here. 

Email: info@doncaster-racecourse.co.uk 

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Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Essential Details about Leicester Racecourse

Leicester Racecourse
Leicester is a racing facility found in Oadby in Leicester in England. The oval shaped racecourse measures about two miles in distance. With a long history that dates back to 1883, the racing facility has held horse racing for more than a century now. Over the last hundred plus years, Leicester has evolved to become one of the most influential sporting venues not only in Britain but also in the entire Europe.

The horse racing grounds host both Flat & National Hunt racing as well as other popular racing occasions in the country every year. Before the 2009/10 events, the last open ditch was shifted to the home straight. The home straight features four prominent fences. Apart from the National Hunt competitions, Leicester also holds flat races that attract thousands of racegoers and patrons from Leicester and other neighbouring locations. Leicester Racecourse has attracted a great deal of popularity for different reasons, the infamous Flockton Grey ringer betting scandal being the most memorable of them all.

The sporting site had its heydeys in the nineteenth century when it hosted some of the most valuable races of the time. These series of notable events included the Prince of Wales Stakes and the famous Portland Stakes. Particularly, the 1889 races carried huge prizes that have to this day remained largely unparalleled in the entire history of British Classic Races. Won by top distinguished trainers of the time, these distinct events have contributed to the long-standing fame the racecourse enjoys.

Apart from routine racing occasions, the sporting venue also provides social and hospitality facilities for everyone. For instance, Leicester Racecourse wedding venue offers exquisite services steeped in a resplendent history and several acres of natural beauty. The amiable customer support staff members in the hospitality section have what it takes to make your special day picture-perfect and memorable. It is the wedding venue of choice for many happy couples who are grateful for having held their auspicious occasion at the wonderful grounds.

With spacious rooms which can accommodate up to 700 guests, Leicester is every would-be couple’s facility of choice. Their experienced wedding coordinators will partner with you to make your event a memorable success. It enables you to incorporate colour and pomp in your wedding and pre-wedding functions. 

The Nelson Club Suite has outstanding views across the widely liked racing grounds. With the ornate furnishing and terrace, you and your guests will sit and savour drinks until sunset. Further, the racecourse provides a picturesque background for cute photographs of you and your treasured guests. Again, all these social and hospitality services at Leicester are close to the city and its transport and hotel facilities.

Their brand facility, dubbed The Cube’, can accommodate up to 700 guests and has a blank canvas and bespoke dressing choices that will make your distinguished guests have a hard-to-forget impression of your function. One of the advantages of taking your special social or corporate occasions to Leicester is that they tailor-make all the services to suit their clients’ individual tastes. To hire conferencing or wedding facilities, you are advised to liaise with the support team ahead of time. You may also visit the venue’s official website for vital information before hiring their social and hospitality services. 


Visit Leicester Website Here

Contact details: Leicester Racecourse, Oadby, Leicester LE2 4AL

Tel: 0116 271 6515 

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Sunday, 8 September 2019

Your Guide to York Racecourse

York Racecourse
York Racecourse is one of the leading Premier tracks in the whole of Europe having lately registered a widely acclaimed win during the Flat Racecourse of the Year Award and again emerged top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain's racecourses.

York Racecourse traces an illustrious history back to Roman and Viking eras. Currently, it is a lively city flourishing as a commercial, sightseeing and regionally leading centre. With a wide range of famous restaurants, excellent shopping opportunities and top-rated attractions, including the universally Jorvik Viking Centre and National Railway Museum, as well as the interesting history of the Minster, Castle and City Walls, supplements York’s all-embracing assortment of first-rate hotel accommodation facilities.

According to the earliest available documents, horseracing functions started at York during the heydays of the enigmatic Emperor Severus in Roman times. Nonetheless, most of the 360,000 fans who will attend the reigning "Northern Racecourse of the Year" this upcoming racing season are not likely to know they are actually taking part in an auspicious spectacle that took place for the very first time about a whole 2,000 years ago.

York Corporation archived documents show that the City initially supported racing events in 1530. In mid-1607, horse sporting is known to have occurred on the ice-covered river Ouse, between Micklegate Tower and the landmark Skeldergate Postern.

The very first all-inclusive records of a race occasion date from 1709, at a time when much of the work was undertaken to improve the racecourse at Clifton Ings which was usually susceptible to regular floods. Regardless of this work, the floods persisted and in 1730 racing shifted to Knavesmire, where the racecourse remains.

As its name clearly implies, Knavesmire was a mire with a prominent stream running through it and a significant amount of leveling and draining was needed to come up the horseshoe shaped racecourse, which was launched for its maiden meeting in 1731.

No permanent structures were put up on Knavesmire up to the time the well-known York architect, John Carr, designed and meticulously constructed the first Grandstand in 1754. This was funded by 250 individuals who each forked out 5 guineas. Each patron and their respective successors were entitled to make use of the stand during the site's lease and were provided with a brass token that contained their name and a prominent photograph of the stand. This represented the model for the late impressive County Stand Badge. 

The York Racecourse Committee, (presently part of York Racecourse Knavesmire LLP) still runs racing at York today and was set up in 1842, to turn around a major decline in the excellence of racing events. By late 1846, the Committee had established the Gimcrack Stakes, which has since this time become among York's most steady races.
York Races' development has been captured in the advancement of the grandstands over the past few years. New stands were put up in 1890 to include much of the initial building and a foremost improvement program, unveiled in 1962, led to the launch of the distinct five-tier grandstand in 1965. The program of improvisations rolled on and by1989 the Melrose Stand was already unveiled, swiftly followed by the prized Knavesmire Stand, with supplementary conference facilities in 1996. In 2003, the Ebor Stand containing, amongst other features, the Nunthorpe Suite, was opened and was preserved for race days for exclusive use by the honorable Annual Badge holders.

In the past few years, York Racecourse, besides hosting numerous stunning York Races, has also staged the Royal Ascot at York in 2005 plus The Ladbrokes St Leger in 2006. 
Despite its prominence with regard to hosting major horse sporting events, York Racecourse is also home to many outstandingly popular hospitality facilities. With well-stocked bars and well-furnished eateries, the facility offers tasty cuisines that will fulfill the wildest appetites of even the finickiest of gourmets. With affordable dining and accommodation amenities, the ubiquitously well-liked racing site has received countless thousands of rave reviews from hordes of enthusiastic sporting adherents as well as the treasured accreditation of high flying racing gurus from all over Europe and the world at large. The hustle and bustle that is the very highlight of a typical racing occasion at York elicit a great deal of comprehensive media coverage since most of the distinguished racecourse’s sporting events are televised live to all across the globe.

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Contact details: York Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Tel: 01904 620911 

Email: enquiries@yorkracecourse.co.uk 


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