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Tuesday, 15 June 2021

Ascot Racecourse Website, Twitter Links & Facebook Page

Used for thoroughbred racing, Ascot Racecourse is located in Ascot, Berkshire, England. It is one of the world’s most notable racecourses regularly hosting major meetings including Royal Ascot.

It is only an estimated six miles from the iconic Windsor Castle, and thus enjoys close associations with the British Royal Family. Hosting flat meetings between May and October and significant jump races throughout the winter season, Ascot Racecourse is indisputably one of the most conspicuous landmarks that define the unique place of Britain on the world’s map. Ascot Racecourse was founded in 1711, with the main event comprising horses that carried a weight of about 76 kilogrammes, and with only six of the horses successfully completing the historical race.

However, this global sporting infrastructure did not get categorised as public property until 1813 when the British Parliament ratified a series of noteworthy legislations that redefined it as a public asset. In 1913, legislation was passed entrusting the management of the sporting grounds to the Ascot Authority that still controls its affairs today. Since the enactment of this statute, Ascot Racecourse has remained constantly operational apart from a short closure that lasted about 26 months, starting from September 2004. During these 26 months, the racing facility was extensively revamped at a cost of £185 million by Populous and Buro Happold and financed by the Allied Irish Bank. After the multi-million titivation, the world-class racecourse was formally reopened to the general public by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth on Tuesday 20, 2006, amid unprecedented pomp and colourful ceremony.

Nonetheless, the 2004-2006 redevelopment of Ascot Racecourse elicited a sharp outcry from the members of the general public who felt that most attention had been paid to hospitality amenities such hotels and bars, which greatly reduced the hitherto well-elevated view of the whole racecourse. In response to this well-deserved censure, the Ascot administration embarked on innovative architectural ameliorations that successfully reprofiled concrete terracing to create more space for patrons as well as achieve a wider eye-view of the racecourse as demanded by the irritated masses. Ascot Racecourse enjoyed remarkable media attention when BBC reduced live coverage its race events in 2009, leading to the much-publicized sponsorship withdrawal by William Hill who cited the just reduced live reporting as the principal impetus for the move. 

Royal Ascot is the centrepiece of Ascot’s year which dates back to 1711 when it was ceremonially inaugurated by Queen Anne. Characterised by the awe-inspiring raising of the Queen’s Royal Standard, the annual Royal Ascot is often attended by Elizabeth II alongside other members of the English Monarchy such as The Prince of Wales. This is a much-hyped event that receives extensive press publicity, with more attention paid to the social aspects of the occasion such as the dressing and mood of the attendees than on the actual racing events. 

The Royal Ascot Week is an immensely significant event on the British social calendar. Normally, there are three enclosures that are widely attended by high-ranking guests from drawn from the royal circle and the outside political.

Visit Ascot Racecourse Here. 

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Contact details: Ascot Racecourse Ltd, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7JX

General Enquiries - Tel: + 44 (0) 844 346 3000 

Email: equiries@ascot.co.uk 


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Monday, 14 June 2021

Windsor Racecourse: Website, Twitter Link & Facebook Page

About seven hundred years ago, Windsor Great Park was known as a royal hunting field, and it is quite easy to conjure up the kings of England and high profile noblemen planning racing contests between each other’s well-trained horses. Racing events occurred there and at Datchet Mead during the rule of Henry VIII. Horseracing at Datchet Ferry was first documented in 1682 during the rule of Charles II, who was such an enthusiastic racing adherent that he put up his royal court at Newmarket. In the mid 18th century, Windsor’s major claim to fame in the horse sporting world was a popular base for those coming to the Royal Ascot gathering each June. While it had its own racing calendar from time to time, the great assembly at Egham was of more historical importance.

The development of steeplechasing occasions in the mid-19th century motivated the running of progressively more regular military gatherings, which were wide patronised with royal and other aristocratic spectators. Flat racing events started on Ray's Meadow, the present site, in 1866. It was set up by John Frail, who graduated from little beginnings as a little-known barber to running Disraeli’s political campaigns in the densely populated Midlands. He and his notable family members proceeded on to own and manage a number of racing facilities in England. In terms of quality, Windsor racing occasions did not even attempt to out-compete Ascot but provided good opportunities to horse owners of less gifted animals in an appealing background not far away from London. After a short time, long jump racing championships was launched here, too.

In late 1923, Windsor Racecourse was the prime scene of a spectacular triple dead heat. Racecourses of the time did not have the advantage of photo-finish facilities, but one cameraman who was always available managed to immortalise the unique images of three horses jumping over the finishing line together. 

As Home Secretary, Winston Spencer Churchill launched a novel Betting Tax in 1926, to near worldwide displeasure. On its very first racing day, bookmakers at the Windsor race assembly went on strike, famously refusing to take bets from the attending punters. The infamous tax was done away a few years later – much to the widespread joy of Windsor fans. Churchill was pardoned by the time he showed an interest in racing events and purchased a few racehorses. His most admired horse, Colonist II, registered a colorful win at Windsor in 1949. 

Windsor was among the very few racecourses authorized to convene race meetings during the two global wars. On one unfortunate occasion, a flying bomb landed on the field during racing, but no fatalities were reported. This manifested the admirable resilience of Windsor Racecourse that has seen it soar through the ranks to become one of the most highly regarded racing sports in the whole of the United Kingdom.

In the 1960s, the usual Monday evening gatherings were started, which presently stretch from spring up to the end of the summer. National Hunt racing’s biggest supporter, Her Majesty The Queen Mother, was always dedicated to looking in if a fixtures coincided with her stay at the royal castle, mostly if one of her horses was participating in an event at Windsor Racecourse. 

Visit Windsor Racecourse Website Here

Contact Details: Royal Windsor Racecourse, Maidenhead Road, Windsor, Berkshire, SL4 5JJ

Tel: 01753 498400 

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Sunday, 13 June 2021

Notable Facts about Doncaster Racecourse

Also known as the Town Moor course, Doncaster Racecourse is situated in Doncaster, South Yorkshire – England. The racecourse is particularly famous for hosting some singularly popular races in Great Britain – the St. Leger Stakes and the Racing Post Trophy. 

Doncaster Racecourse is indisputably one of the oldest facilities of its kind in the whole of Europe and Britain in particular. Racing dates back to the first decades of the 16th century. According to the available records, annual meetings have been held at the racecourse for well over four centuries, exempting a hiatus that occurred at the time of the world wars. 

Even though racing was temporarily stopped for some time in the early 1600s, events resumed shortly after the problematic group of ruffians who led to the infamous brief halt was effectively contained. As early as 1614, normal racing resumed at the racecourse. 

Doncaster Racecourse holds the proud status of the top 10 oldest racing facilities in England and Europe in general. In terms of physical capacity, the grounds have been mapped out as the largest horse riding amenity in the whole of Britain, with regard to surface area and the size of courses and tracks.

Owing to its prominently legendary position, Doncaster Racecourse has successfully popularized its own horse sporting competition over past decades – the Doncaster Cup. Noted as one of the most well-liked events spearheaded by an independent racing spot, the regular championships have played a critical role in enhancing the already distinctly influential status of Doncaster. As a result, the state-of-the-art amenity draws thousands of racing enthusiasts and sports sightseers from around the world.  

After the restoration of the first few decades of the 17th century, the continentally famed racing sport shifted location in 1776. Despite this relocation, the grounds have nonetheless steadily increased in fame and infrastructural capabilities. Immediately after changing its setting, Colonel St. Leger started a routine event which involved five races. 

As stated before in this article, activities at the racing field didn’t occur during the two world wars as it was used for military purposes by the indigenous forces. Due to the war-period closure, substitute regular events were instead held at Newmarket. Although the competitions did not register any laudable turn-out, they were nevertheless described as having attracted unanticipated crowds of fans that the administration had not looked forward to attracting at a time when the entire Europe was more interested in military showdowns than in the leisure excitements of sporting events. The substitute races continued for over three years, from 1915 to 1918 – successfully run until the end of the WWI.  

Located in the epicenter of the United Kingdom, the racecourse boasts extraordinary hospitality. Ranging from the unrivaled scenery of nighttime street life to a commodious Grandstand that houses wonderful treats, the site is home to hundreds of top quality dining and accommodation facilities. Despite your finicky choices, the racecourse offers at least something extraordinary for virtually everyone – including food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, recreation services, and all.

Contact details: Doncaster Racecourse, The Grandstand, Leger Way, Doncaster, DN2 6BB 

Tel: 01302 304 200

Visit Doncaster website here. 

Email: info@doncaster-racecourse.co.uk 

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Saturday, 12 June 2021

Your Guide to York Racecourse

York Racecourse is one of the leading Premier tracks in the whole of Europe having lately registered a widely acclaimed win during the Flat Racecourse of the Year Award and again emerged top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain's racecourses.

York Racecourse traces an illustrious history back to Roman and Viking eras. Currently, it is a lively city flourishing as a commercial, sightseeing and regionally leading centre. With a wide range of famous restaurants, excellent shopping opportunities and top-rated attractions, including the universally Jorvik Viking Centre and National Railway Museum, as well as the interesting history of the Minster, Castle and City Walls, supplements York’s all-embracing assortment of first-rate hotel accommodation facilities.

According to the earliest available documents, horseracing functions started at York during the heydays of the enigmatic Emperor Severus in Roman times. Nonetheless, most of the 360,000 fans who will attend the reigning "Northern Racecourse of the Year" this upcoming racing season are not likely to know they are actually taking part in an auspicious spectacle that took place for the very first time about a whole 2,000 years ago.

York Corporation archived documents show that the City initially supported racing events in 1530. In mid-1607, horse sporting is known to have occurred on the ice-covered river Ouse, between Micklegate Tower and the landmark Skeldergate Postern.

The very first all-inclusive records of a race occasion date from 1709, at a time when much of the work was undertaken to improve the racecourse at Clifton Ings which was usually susceptible to regular floods. Regardless of this work, the floods persisted and in 1730 racing shifted to Knavesmire, where the racecourse remains.

As its name clearly implies, Knavesmire was a mire with a prominent stream running through it and a significant amount of leveling and draining was needed to come up the horseshoe shaped racecourse, which was launched for its maiden meeting in 1731.

No permanent structures were put up on Knavesmire up to the time the well-known York architect, John Carr, designed and meticulously constructed the first Grandstand in 1754. This was funded by 250 individuals who each forked out 5 guineas. Each patron and their respective successors were entitled to make use of the stand during the site's lease and were provided with a brass token that contained their name and a prominent photograph of the stand. This represented the model for the late impressive County Stand Badge. 

The York Racecourse Committee, (presently part of York Racecourse Knavesmire LLP) still runs racing at York today and was set up in 1842, to turn around a major decline in the excellence of racing events. By late 1846, the Committee had established the Gimcrack Stakes, which has since this time become among York's most steady races.
York Races' development has been captured in the advancement of the grandstands over the past few years. New stands were put up in 1890 to include much of the initial building and a foremost improvement program, unveiled in 1962, led to the launch of the distinct five-tier grandstand in 1965. The program of improvisations rolled on and by1989 the Melrose Stand was already unveiled, swiftly followed by the prized Knavesmire Stand, with supplementary conference facilities in 1996. In 2003, the Ebor Stand containing, amongst other features, the Nunthorpe Suite, was opened and was preserved for race days for exclusive use by the honorable Annual Badge holders.

In the past few years, York Racecourse, besides hosting numerous stunning York Races, has also staged the Royal Ascot at York in 2005 plus The Ladbrokes St Leger in 2006. 
Despite its prominence with regard to hosting major horse sporting events, York Racecourse is also home to many outstandingly popular hospitality facilities. With well-stocked bars and well-furnished eateries, the facility offers tasty cuisines that will fulfill the wildest appetites of even the finickiest of gourmets. With affordable dining and accommodation amenities, the ubiquitously well-liked racing site has received countless thousands of rave reviews from hordes of enthusiastic sporting adherents as well as the treasured accreditation of high flying racing gurus from all over Europe and the world at large. The hustle and bustle that is the very highlight of a typical racing occasion at York elicit a great deal of comprehensive media coverage since most of the distinguished racecourse’s sporting events are televised live to all across the globe.

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Contact details: York Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Tel: 01904 620911 

Email: enquiries@yorkracecourse.co.uk 


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