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Friday, 22 October 2021

Notable Facts about Doncaster Racecourse

Also known as the Town Moor course, Doncaster Racecourse is situated in Doncaster, South Yorkshire – England. The racecourse is particularly famous for hosting some singularly popular races in Great Britain – the St. Leger Stakes and the Racing Post Trophy. 

Doncaster Racecourse is indisputably one of the oldest facilities of its kind in the whole of Europe and Britain in particular. Racing dates back to the first decades of the 16th century. According to the available records, annual meetings have been held at the racecourse for well over four centuries, exempting a hiatus that occurred at the time of the world wars. 

Even though racing was temporarily stopped for some time in the early 1600s, events resumed shortly after the problematic group of ruffians who led to the infamous brief halt was effectively contained. As early as 1614, normal racing resumed at the racecourse. 

Doncaster Racecourse holds the proud status of the top 10 oldest racing facilities in England and Europe in general. In terms of physical capacity, the grounds have been mapped out as the largest horse riding amenity in the whole of Britain, with regard to surface area and the size of courses and tracks.

Owing to its prominently legendary position, Doncaster Racecourse has successfully popularized its own horse sporting competition over past decades – the Doncaster Cup. Noted as one of the most well-liked events spearheaded by an independent racing spot, the regular championships have played a critical role in enhancing the already distinctly influential status of Doncaster. As a result, the state-of-the-art amenity draws thousands of racing enthusiasts and sports sightseers from around the world.  

After the restoration of the first few decades of the 17th century, the continentally famed racing sport shifted location in 1776. Despite this relocation, the grounds have nonetheless steadily increased in fame and infrastructural capabilities. Immediately after changing its setting, Colonel St. Leger started a routine event which involved five races. 

As stated before in this article, activities at the racing field didn’t occur during the two world wars as it was used for military purposes by the indigenous forces. Due to the war-period closure, substitute regular events were instead held at Newmarket. Although the competitions did not register any laudable turn-out, they were nevertheless described as having attracted unanticipated crowds of fans that the administration had not looked forward to attracting at a time when the entire Europe was more interested in military showdowns than in the leisure excitements of sporting events. The substitute races continued for over three years, from 1915 to 1918 – successfully run until the end of the WWI.  

Located in the epicenter of the United Kingdom, the racecourse boasts extraordinary hospitality. Ranging from the unrivaled scenery of nighttime street life to a commodious Grandstand that houses wonderful treats, the site is home to hundreds of top quality dining and accommodation facilities. Despite your finicky choices, the racecourse offers at least something extraordinary for virtually everyone – including food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, recreation services, and all.

Contact details: Doncaster Racecourse, The Grandstand, Leger Way, Doncaster, DN2 6BB 

Tel: 01302 304 200

Visit Doncaster website here. 

Email: info@doncaster-racecourse.co.uk 

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Wednesday, 20 October 2021

Wolverhampton Racecourse: Website, Twitter Link & Facebook Page

Visitors and patrons to Wolverhampton Racecourse today may be tempted into thinking that it is a contemporary facility with scanty or no history at all. Its current amenities and the state-of-the-art hotel facilities around the Dunstall Recreation centre offer the false impression that these illustrious grounds have recently been established.

Nevertheless, racing at Wolverhampton Racecourse has been documented as among some of the earliest events in Britain. Despite having changed locations several times, the racing facility is one of the most prominent racing centres in the United Kingdom. Attracting hordes of enthusiasts from all over England, Wolverhampton has joined the club of the most enduring horse sporting facilities that prominently shaped the history and nature of English horse riding competition. In a similar vein, the grounds elicits a great deal of unceasing media publicity from the four winds of the earth. Track events at Wolverhampton can be viewed throughout the world.  

Located in the heart of England, Wolverhampton is currently the busiest horse riding site in the United Kingdom, currently staging approximately 90 race meetings every year. Surrounded on one side by the Stafford and the landmark Worcester canal and on another by the major railway line from Shrewsbury, along with the historical Birmingham Canal, it might appear that Dunstall Park has so little to even recommend it, but nothing could be so far from the bare truth. 

The Wolverhampton area has excellent transport networks, being slightly close to the M6 and M54 notable motorways. Positioned north of the civic centre, the racecourse is to be found a little off the A449 dual carriageway, where there are many chocolate road signs providing the final directions to the track. As well as a well-laid-out racing venue, the globally recognized facility also houses a conferencing & exhibitions centre, as well as a panoramic eatery and a well-furnished hotel. 

There is a rich history of horse racing occurring at locations in Wolverhampton, dating back as far as mid-1887. Dunstall Park course was customarily a mixed racing venue, offering both flat and National Hunt cards on the turf, but this all altered in 1993 when the racecourse underwent a full redevelopment and was uplifted into the first all-weather, resplendently floodlit track in Great Britain. The main turf course remained in place nonetheless but was only made use of sparingly with a hardly any jumping event each year. 

Originally, a Fibresand track akin to that at Southwell was set up, but in 2004, this was substituted by a Polytrack surface, along with redesigning to some of the other key amenities. Since that time, the racecourse has only held all-weather, flat racing events. 
Wolverhampton Racecourse is left-handed (that is anti-clockwise), oval-shaped, roughly one mile in total length with well-spaced chutes for 6 and 7-furlong starts. It is the most analogous in proportion, of any of the British racecourses to tracks found in the United States. Nimble and handy types of horses appear to do well here and it is normally considered that there is likely little draw unfairness at Dunstall Park. As such, many important events in the British horse sporting calendar are held at Wolverhampton Racecourse.

Visit Wolverhampton Racecourse Website Here

Contact details: Wolverhampton Racecourse/Holiday Inn Garden Court, Dunstall Park, Wolverhampton, WV6 OPE

Tel: 01902 390003

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Monday, 18 October 2021

Great Yarmouth Horse Racing Open For Business

This well-known racecourse is one mile north of Great Yarmouth, belonging to Arena Racing Company. The well-designed track assumes the shape of a narrow four-sided figure that’s about one mile and three-quarters round, with two fairly long straights that measure about five furlongs. It is among Britain’s many left-handed courses, used for flat turf racing events. 

The racecourse hosts some of the most noteworthy sporting events on the British calendar and it is, as a result of its busy schedule, a leading horse racing ground in Britain if not Europe. 

Racing meetings were recorded for the first time in 1715 when a lease was issued by the Yarmouth Corporation to an association of visionary innkeepers for some piece of land where the group could stage local race meetings. Events may well have taken place at Great Yarmouth before the recorded date. Nonetheless, it is generally believed that such activities, if any at all, must have been infrequent involving small groups of individuals from Norfolk.

Sports historians believe horse racing at Great Yarmouth must have been quite intermittent throughout the 18th century. Racing almost certainly coincided with the annual town fair. 

Miscellaneous events such as donkey racing competitions and chasing a swine with a soap-stained tail were staged. In 1810 formal racing began. Records show meetings involving thoroughbred races and ample prize money at Great Yarmouth Racecourse from this date. 

Great Yarmouth Racecourse, on the South Denes, became fully established shortly after. A two-day race meeting was convened in the late summer every year. From 1866 race fixtures increased. The continuous upward trend carried on from decade to decade until the long-established racing facility soared to its current glory as one of the world’s most influential horse riding amenities.

Racing at Great Yarmouth restarted after a short suspension during the first world war. In 1920, the just reopened racecourse was relocated to the nearby North Denes, as a result of immense pressure from the local fishing industry to extend its structures onto the piece of land on the South Denes. Two grandstands were demolished and shifted to North Denes, where they are presently situated. As such, Great Yarmouth is one of the oldest racing structures in the United Kingdom that have maintained their initial geographical positions to the present day. Great Yarmouth’s enduring fame and stature are a testament to Britain’s long and colorful racing history that stretches over four centuries of enthusiastic horse sporting. 

The local authorities had taken over the running of the racecourse in 1904, and for most of the 20th century, the course profited from the local community, not only by offering entertainment but also because its proceeds helped to maintain their rates at the bare-minimum. Since 2001, they have been the smaller shareholders in a new company formed to manage the distinguished racecourse. A private entity, Arena Racing Company, is the main shareholder. For that time, they have been capable of financing improvements that the Council could not fund, including the building of an extra grandstand. 

The most important event at Great Yarmouth is the John Musker Fillies' Stakes, staged over one mile and a quarter every year in September. Nevertheless, any of the racing events for two-year-olds can be chiefly instructive as some of these juveniles go on to participate in and win highly regarded races. 

During the 1998 competitions, Dubai Millennium won his debut at Yarmouth extraordinarily, ably ridden by Frankie Dettori, prior to becoming one of the most accomplished horses to run for the Godolphin operation, proudly owned by the Dubai royal family. Since then, Great Yarmouth victors included Ouija Board, who further won the English and Irish Oaks before registering impressive, score at the Breeders Cup, the yearly international horse racing championships held in the USA. Wilko, Raven's Pass and Donativum were among the winners at Yarmouth headed for future Breeders Cup glory. 

Personally, I love Great Yarmouth. It's a place I frequent often for a gamble, whether at the horse races or the Grosvenor Casino at Marine Parade. I've had many a winning evening there after a good day at the races. There are a couple of casinos at Great Yarmouth so you may wish to check out these casino reviews for online alternatives.  

Visit Great Yarmouth Racecourse Website Here

Contact details: Great Yarmouth, Jellicoe Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, NR30 4AU

Tel: 01493 842527

Email: info@greatyarmouth-racecourse.co.uk 

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Friday, 15 October 2021

Important Details about Haydock Racecourse

One of the major racing venues in England, Haydock Racecourse is located in the Merseyside area. Although established at a time when there were already many such amenities in Britain, the Haydock course has nonetheless increasingly soared in influence to occupy a prime position among Britain’s most significant racing sites. 

Haydock racecourse is especially unique due to the fact that it is located in a parkland area. It is also bounded by two important towns - Ashton-in-Makerfield to the north, Golborne to the east and Newton-le-Willows to the south. Its setting between these influential towns is among the main factors that have contributed to Haydock’s progressively burgeoning status as a leading horse sporting and conferencing centre.

The racecourse area was initially used for Hare coursing in the early 1880s before it was later converted into grounds for horse racing purposes. However, the place was formally opened for horse racing in 1899. After this, it underwent a transformative chain of redesigning which marked the facility’s long journey to its present glamorous appeal.
Haydock’s series of key structural developments were ably overseen by men of notable zeal and skill, chief among them being Sydney Sandon, who takes the biggest credit for spearheading the architectural changes of the early 20th century. Mr Sandon served as the course secretary for a few years, at which post he shepherded some grand restructuring projects at the sporting amenity. Later into the 20th Century, he again served as the racecourse’s managing chairman and continued the major projects that had been flagged off during his successful tenure as secretary. 

Haydock Racecourse has a famously flat course that endears it to thousands of racegoers and trainers from all over the United Kingdom. Again, the left-handed oval track measures about one mile and five furlongs – obviously not one the longest racecourses in the country. While the racecourse is generally flat, it develops a slight rise toward the run-in. Moreover, an extension of the course enables sprints of up to six furlongs to be run on the straight course. The horse riding grounds provide courses for both National Hunt events and flat racing competitions.

Furthermore, Haydock features exquisite hospitality services that are not found in some other racing sites in the United Kingdom. These matchless facilities include top class bars that offer both soft drinks and alcoholic beverages. However, entrants to the Haydock drinking rooms are usually requested to present their badges and other entry requirements before they are allowed in. Again, pets such as dogs are not allowed into the drinking are unless they are guide pets. The champagne bar at Haydock is particularly popular with patrons, racegoers, and keen clubbers from the entire Merseyside area.

Some of the magnificent dining and accommodation facilities at the racecourse include Kauto Star Restaurant which offers unbeatable quality services. With an informal dining environment and friendly caterers, one can book a place at the trendy hotel for as little as £75. Other regularly frequented restaurants and hotels at Haydock include Harry’s Bistro and the Parke Suite Restaurant. Just like Kauto, these catering centres offer a variety of drinks and scrumptious cuisines that meet every guest’s individual tastes.

Visit Haydock website here

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Contact details: Haydock Park Racecourse, Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, WA12 0HQ

Tel: 0344 579 3006

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