Critical Details about Nottingham Racecourse

Nottingham Racecourse Hospitality
Nottingham Racecourse is a thoroughbred racing venue that is positioned in Nottinghamshire in England. Located near Colwick Park near the River Trent, the facility is an estimated three kilometres from the city centre.  

There are in fact two courses at the racecourse – one inside of the other. Both courses measure about a one-and-a-half mile and left-handed. The inner course is usually used during autumn and spring and measures about five furlongs straight. The outer one is often made use of during summer events and measures about six furlongs straight. One of the most outstanding attributes of these courses is that they have relatively gentle turns and have minor gradients despite its home finish being really sharp. Due to its unique set of distinct characteristics, Nottingham is ideal for balanced horses as opposed to those that have long strides. 

Nottingham has a very long history. Founded in the early years of the 18th century, it has been in existence for more than two centuries. Initially located in Nottingham Forest, it is doubtless one of the very oldest racing facilities in England. In a similar vein, it is one of the earliest racecourses to granted the Royal Plate Charter by the monarch. At its inception, the Royal Plate was run in four-mile heats by horses aged 6 years carrying 12-stone weight.
The sporting venue was moved to its present site in 1892. After being transferred to Colwick Park in 1892, the facility continued growing in fame and popularity to become one of the top ranking racing facilities in the United Kingdom. The local corporation purchased over 293 acres of land at £500,000, plunging the future of the course in doubt. However, the Levy Board funded improvements to the location and gave a lease to Racecourse Holdings Trust for a small sum.

Nottingham Racecourse held both flat and jump courses for many decades until things changed in the 1990s. At this time, the management decided to abandon the National Hunt events to concentrate on flat races only. As for transport links, the site was connected to the urban neighbourhoods by its own railway line until it was severed in the 1960s. Any keen visitor will spot the remnants of the railway on what is presently referred to as Colwick loop road.

Nottingham is famous for hosting some two very influential sporting events in the UK’s racing calendar. These listed races include Kilvington Stakes and the Further Flight Stakes. However, the racecourse does not hold any other racing functions of countrywide note apart from these two major races. 

Nonetheless, this does not place Nottingham in the clutter of many little-known racing sites in Britain. While not among the largest in terms of surface area, or one of the most furnished in terms of technological and architectural apparatus, it is still one of the most refined and widely liked racing arenas in the Nottinghamshire region and beyond. Its meeting and conferencing services, for instance, are among the very best the whole country. It is also a must-tour destination for horse sporting sightseers from all over the world.* 

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Contact details: Nottingham Racecourse, Colwick Park, Nottingham. NG2 4BE

Tel: 0115 9580620 



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Essential Details about Leicester Racecourse

Leicester Racecourse
Leicester is a racing facility found in Oadby in Leicester in England. The oval shaped racecourse measures about two miles in distance. With a long history that dates back to 1883, the racing facility has held horse racing for more than a century now. Over the last hundred plus years, Leicester has evolved to become one of the most influential sporting venues not only in Britain but also in the entire Europe.

The horse racing grounds host both Flat & National Hunt racing as well as other popular racing occasions in the country every year. Before the 2009/10 events, the last open ditch was shifted to the home straight. The home straight features four prominent fences. Apart from the National Hunt competitions, Leicester also holds flat races that attract thousands of racegoers and patrons from Leicester and other neighbouring locations. Leicester Racecourse has attracted a great deal of popularity for different reasons, the infamous Flockton Grey ringer betting scandal being the most memorable of them all.

The sporting site had its heydeys in the nineteenth century when it hosted some of the most valuable races of the time. These series of notable events included the Prince of Wales Stakes and the famous Portland Stakes. Particularly, the 1889 races carried huge prizes that have to this day remained largely unparalleled in the entire history of British Classic Races. Won by top distinguished trainers of the time, these distinct events have contributed to the long-standing fame the racecourse enjoys.

Apart from routine racing occasions, the sporting venue also provides social and hospitality facilities for everyone. For instance, Leicester Racecourse wedding venue offers exquisite services steeped in a resplendent history and several acres of natural beauty. The amiable customer support staff members in the hospitality section have what it takes to make your special day picture-perfect and memorable. It is the wedding venue of choice for many happy couples who are grateful for having held their auspicious occasion at the wonderful grounds.

With spacious rooms which can accommodate up to 700 guests, Leicester is every would-be couple’s facility of choice. Their experienced wedding coordinators will partner with you to make your event a memorable success. It enables you to incorporate colour and pomp in your wedding and pre-wedding functions. 

The Nelson Club Suite has outstanding views across the widely liked racing grounds. With the ornate furnishing and terrace, you and your guests will sit and savour drinks until sunset. Further, the racecourse provides a picturesque background for cute photographs of you and your treasured guests. Again, all these social and hospitality services at Leicester are close to the city and its transport and hotel facilities.

Their brand facility, dubbed The Cube’, can accommodate up to 700 guests and has a blank canvas and bespoke dressing choices that will make your distinguished guests have a hard-to-forget impression of your function. One of the advantages of taking your special social or corporate occasions to Leicester is that they tailor-make all the services to suit their clients’ individual tastes. To hire conferencing or wedding facilities, you are advised to liaise with the support team ahead of time. You may also visit the venue’s official website for vital information before hiring their social and hospitality services. 


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Contact details: Leicester Racecourse, Oadby, Leicester LE2 4AL

Tel: 0116 271 6515 

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Comprehensive Info about Goodwood Racecourse

Goodwood racecourse
Goodwood is a horse racing venue that is located about 5 miles west of Chichester in West Sussex – England. Indisputably one of the very best equestrian sporting facilities in Britain and the world at large, the venue is managed by the Duke of Richmond and his family. With the famous Duke headquartered in a nearby Goodwood House, members of the royal family are well-known to both fans and racegoers. The key role played by the Duke in the administration of the racecourse has given the racing arena a coveted place in the annals of English horse racing.

Goodwood Racecourse is often given preferential treatment by nationwide event organisers and officials due to the fundamental services available at the sporting centre. As one of the very few racing facilities handled by a noble member of the British Royalty, the racecourse enjoys a prestigious standing that very few similar sites can rival. Its state-of-the-art facilities are simply the envy of most other racecourses in the United Kingdom. It is always a top favourite with leading sports journalists worldwide while its social and recreational departments attract diverse classes of punters from all over the globe.

Goodwood Racecourse holds the yearly Glorious Goodwood gathering which is one of the central highlights of the British flat racing calendar. The annual meetings at Goodwood usually draw the attention of both local and international sport news bulletins. Most notably, the Duke of Richmond graces the once-in-a-year assemblies, giving the occasion and the racecourse a great deal of worldwide significance. Sponsors from across the sectors usually target these yearly gatherings in their keen pursuit of the prized advertising deals provided by the trailblazing racing amenity.

Further, the widely recognised site also hosts two of the universally popular UK’s 31 Group One flat racing events. During these key sporting events, the racecourse’s crowd capacity gets badly overwhelmed that some fans go without sitting places. The two much-publicized UK 31 events that Goodwood hosts are the Nassau Stakes and the Sussex Stakes – essential competitions that are normally televised across the world. Television screens are all tuned into the Goodwood field during these notably universal events, and advertisers cash in on the rare opportunity the twin occasions provide.

Goodwood Racecourse enjoys a considerably well-suited location in the hugely attractive area north of the Trundle Iron Age hill fort. The prime location has therefore contributed to the huge patronage that the facility enjoys during prominent events and also on normal days. The fairly raised ground is usually used as an alternative Grandstand on racing days. Fans that are familiar with the Chichester facility often prefer the informal grandstand to the official one because the former offers an uninterrupted view of the entire racecourse a safe distance from the smothering crowds. 

Despite its good location, the racecourse’s proximity to the nearby coast means that it is foggy most of the times. As a result of the sometimes inclement weather at Goodwood, certain high-attendance have severally been undertaken at other less endowed horse riding facilities in the United Kingdom. However, the prime racing facility enjoys friendly weather conditions most of the time. As such, Good Racecourse is hardly shunned by patrons, racers, or trainers exempting the very few relatively short spells characterised by unwelcoming weather. 

Unlike other racecourses that invariably resemble each other in several profound respects, Goodwood Racecourse is a sharp departure from this familiar trend. As such, Goodwood’s expertly laid out tracks and courses have a number of unconventional physical aspects that set them apart from those of other well-known horse riding spots in the United Kingdom. For instance, the racing tracks have straight six furlongs, often known as the "Stewards' Cup Course"- which is uniquely hilly for the first furlong but mostly downhill to the very end. 

Yet again, there is a tight-handed loop found at the near end of the straight, where the various other long-distance field events start. These long-distance events start-points include the 1 mile 2 furlongs (1m 2f) "Craven Course", the 1m 4f "Gratwicke Course" and the 1m 6f "Bentinck Course. This course is only used for flat races only. Despite these physical peculiarities, Goodwood is still one of the well-rated racing centres by leading racers and ward-winging track champions. 

Goodwood Racecourse enjoyed unprecedented media attention when its late summer meetings were broadcast live on ITV between 1968 and 1970. The routine racing assemblies attracted big names in the racing fraternity as well as other celebrated personages outside the horse sporting world. From the early 2000s, some of the essential horse riding events on the grounds occasionally appeared on Channel 4. 

Nevertheless, BBC’s far outweighed any other journalistic attention showered on the well-known racing arena. Covering the grounds with an exclusive deal that discouraged broadcast by any other television station, the global media behemoth served the facility without any rival competition from 1956 to 2006. 

After the 50 years of nearly uninterrupted coverage of the Goodwood’s interesting racing events, BBC was denied this lucrative deal and instead was given to Chanel 4. This widely discussed move was most likely motivated by a fresh desire to meet the ever-changing racing needs of viewers and fans, as well as a host of other intricate contractual technicalities. Channel 4 has steadily maintained its coverage of Goodwood’s key occasions since 2006 – a helpfully symbiotic deal which has extensively marketed the media channel and the facility promotes. 

In the last 18th century, Goodwood made history as the very first British racing site to adopt the flag start. These changes were implemented at the request of Lord George Bentinck after much grievous inefficiency that had been witnessed previously. For instance, a shambolic event start that was superintended by an elder starter with speech difficulties badly affected a well-regarded champion of those days named Sam Arnul. 

The historical Goodwood event start changes ensured that all the racing competitions were fairly officiated regardless of any possible inefficiency involving either the participating racers or the officiating starters. With this widely lauded ratification, Goodwood Racecourse cut itself a name as the preferred racing ground for every horse rider of distinguished taste. Fan following also intensified upon the implementation of the field amendment that was deservedly granted at Lord Bentinck’s historical behest.

Visit Goodwood website here.

Contact details: The Goodwood Estate Company Limited, Goodwood House, Chichester, West Sussex, PO18 OPX

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Your Guide to York Racecourse

York Racecourse
York Racecourse is one of the leading Premier tracks in the whole of Europe having lately registered a widely acclaimed win during the Flat Racecourse of the Year Award and again emerged top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain's racecourses.

York Racecourse traces an illustrious history back to Roman and Viking eras. Currently, it is a lively city flourishing as a commercial, sightseeing and regionally leading centre. With a wide range of famous restaurants, excellent shopping opportunities and top-rated attractions, including the universally Jorvik Viking Centre and National Railway Museum, as well as the interesting history of the Minster, Castle and City Walls, supplements York’s all-embracing assortment of first-rate hotel accommodation facilities.

According to the earliest available documents, horseracing functions started at York during the heydays of the enigmatic Emperor Severus in Roman times. Nonetheless, most of the 360,000 fans who will attend the reigning "Northern Racecourse of the Year" this upcoming racing season are not likely to know they are actually taking part in an auspicious spectacle that took place for the very first time about a whole 2,000 years ago.

York Corporation archived documents show that the City initially supported racing events in 1530. In mid-1607, horse sporting is known to have occurred on the ice-covered river Ouse, between Micklegate Tower and the landmark Skeldergate Postern.

The very first all-inclusive records of a race occasion date from 1709, at a time when much of the work was undertaken to improve the racecourse at Clifton Ings which was usually susceptible to regular floods. Regardless of this work, the floods persisted and in 1730 racing shifted to Knavesmire, where the racecourse remains.

As its name clearly implies, Knavesmire was a mire with a prominent stream running through it and a significant amount of leveling and draining was needed to come up the horseshoe shaped racecourse, which was launched for its maiden meeting in 1731.

No permanent structures were put up on Knavesmire up to the time the well-known York architect, John Carr, designed and meticulously constructed the first Grandstand in 1754. This was funded by 250 individuals who each forked out 5 guineas. Each patron and their respective successors were entitled to make use of the stand during the site's lease and were provided with a brass token that contained their name and a prominent photograph of the stand. This represented the model for the late impressive County Stand Badge. 

The York Racecourse Committee, (presently part of York Racecourse Knavesmire LLP) still runs racing at York today and was set up in 1842, to turn around a major decline in the excellence of racing events. By late 1846, the Committee had established the Gimcrack Stakes, which has since this time become among York's most steady races.
York Races' development has been captured in the advancement of the grandstands over the past few years. New stands were put up in 1890 to include much of the initial building and a foremost improvement program, unveiled in 1962, led to the launch of the distinct five-tier grandstand in 1965. The program of improvisations rolled on and by1989 the Melrose Stand was already unveiled, swiftly followed by the prized Knavesmire Stand, with supplementary conference facilities in 1996. In 2003, the Ebor Stand containing, amongst other features, the Nunthorpe Suite, was opened and was preserved for race days for exclusive use by the honorable Annual Badge holders.

In the past few years, York Racecourse, besides hosting numerous stunning York Races, has also staged the Royal Ascot at York in 2005 plus The Ladbrokes St Leger in 2006. 
Despite its prominence with regard to hosting major horse sporting events, York Racecourse is also home to many outstandingly popular hospitality facilities. With well-stocked bars and well-furnished eateries, the facility offers tasty cuisines that will fulfill the wildest appetites of even the finickiest of gourmets. With affordable dining and accommodation amenities, the ubiquitously well-liked racing site has received countless thousands of rave reviews from hordes of enthusiastic sporting adherents as well as the treasured accreditation of high flying racing gurus from all over Europe and the world at large. The hustle and bustle that is the very highlight of a typical racing occasion at York elicit a great deal of comprehensive media coverage since most of the distinguished racecourse’s sporting events are televised live to all across the globe.

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Contact details: York Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Tel: 01904 620911 

Email: enquiries@yorkracecourse.co.uk 


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